Monday, December 26, 2016

Time of Reckoning

Well, as the end of the year approaches, it is time to do the math on my "100% painted project". My numbers took a hit as I sold off my ~2500pt (that is, 8th edition Warhammer points) beastmen army. I was just running out of storage space and figured that someone else may make better use of it. However, I have regained some ground by painting a bunch of my 4th edition Kev Adams goblins. I am sitting flat at 52% of my models painted, which is where I was in July 2016 (although this was also before I sold my fully painted beastmen army and lost a significant amount of ground). Should have kept the buggers! As a compulsive collector, I have also shamefully purchased some more models although far less than I did in previous years. If this project has helped me, it has at least made me experience less impulse buys

All in all, not a bad year for 2016 but still loads to do. I think that at it's inception I had set a goal to finish painting all my models in a 2-year period. That was back in July 2016. So I still have about 1.5 years to go until July 2018. The bulk of my unpainted models lie in my Orcs and Goblins collection, with 456 unpainted greenskins. Do you think I will finish? Is there anyone else who has set the lofty goal of painting all their miniatures and achieved it? If it wasn't for the collapse of the Old World and the advent of AoS (which I do not have any interest in), I would still be buying models and making my goal of 100% painted more difficult. Thankfully, this is not the case but I am still tempted by the occasional Oldhammer model.


Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Mud duds

No goblin army would be characterful if it wasn't completely unreliable. And what's more unreliable than trolls! By the same token, trolls, giants and monsters are part of what define a goblin army in this hobbyist's opinion. They also pack a punch when they do what they are supposed to do.

So here they are: Pug, Glug and Trug. Their sheer size and uncomeliness is probably as important in battle as their fighting prowess. If it wasn't for the fact the goblin troops are so expendable, their indiscriminate attacks on friends and foe may be considered at tactical liability. Thankfully, goblin chieftains don't get caught up in these minute details, and the 3 troll brothers always find themselves at the front of goblin battle-lines in times of conflict.



Gristletooth's night goblin militia

I've had these night goblins painted for a while, but I just got around to putting them on the base. This is Gristletooth's night goblin unit.

Armed with little more than hand-weapons salvaged from the battlefield, the only thing keeping this  rag-tag unit of night goblins together is their fear for Gristletooth. Rumored to be named for a piece of troll gristle stuck between his teeth, Gristletooth claims to derive his strength from a frost troll that he stabbed and ate. Of course, he has no witnesses to this heroic deed, but no members of his mob dare to contest his authority ... yet.


Sunday, December 18, 2016

Sharpooth's Wolf Raiders

Well, I have been a busy little bee painting up unit after unit of goblins. While the sculpts are extremely characterful, I can tell you that I do not, at all, miss prepping metal miniatures.

The first in the batch are Sharptooth's Wolf Raiders: 5 marauder goblin wolf riders. While theft and sabotage are considered normal is goblin society, these misfits fled for their lives after they were caught stealing ale from the wine cellars of their goblin king, Grom. They learnt to lead a nomadic life, acting occasionally as mercenaries to benefit from the spoils of war, as well as steal from their temporary allies during times of peace.